Return to Home

Catching Up

St. Andrew's conference went well. Did good networking and felt a little more like the Early Book people are my "tribe." Was a bit of a fan girl at the scholar running my session. They publish a journal from the presentations and I may try to submit to it. My paper was a little off to the side of my dissertation, so this might be a happy home for the material.

Scottish Perspectives

Had a good time on the train trip down from Scotland. Had a lot of anxiety because all the seats had "reserved" tags on them. But I finally sat down with three girls at a table, and they pointed out that the seat I was in should already have a passenger, and since it didn't, I could sit in it all the way to London. They were three girls who had just graduated from high shcool in Dundee, Scotland, going to London for the week to celebrate. We all sat with our iPhones out on the table and talked about what we thought of each other's accents.

I said I'd been laughed at for calling a "napkin" a "napkin" in London. They asked what the Londoners called it. I told them a "serviette." They then broke into a long discussion amongst themselves over whether they'd ever use that term or not. They all agreed it seemed a little pretentiously posh, and one of them had never heard the term before. I asked what they called it then. They said, "napkin." (Duh.) So perhaps that's why in the US we use that term. A Scots/Irish immigrant thing?

Wimbeldon-- so if you don't know that a Scot won Wimbeldon, well, you should. The pubs went wild in St. Andrew's so I'm told. They say that when Andy Murray loses Wimbeldon, the London sportscasters call him a Scot, but this year when he won, they called him a Brit. Everyone I bumped into in Scotland was very clear about Murray's nationality. Even the taxi driver wanted to talk about it on the way to the station.

Shelly Arrives!

So Shelly arrived in good time and with very little trouble. I left her to settle in and did a couple of hours at the library. Then came back and we did afternoon tea in the foyer, dinner at the pub across the street, and had a failed attempt at riding around on the tour bus. Tomorrow we'll give it another go.

Pretty Pics:

Click on the thumbnails to see a larger version and enter a slideshow of the larger versions.

St. Andrew's grey
St. Andrew's grey
The whole town and college of St. Andrew's is the same color of grey stone.
Nuremberg Chronicles Annotations
Nuremberg Chronicles Annotations
So someone who had actually been to all the places described in the Nuremberg Chronicle made notations in his copy when he bought it. Notice-- he's not a fan.

"Castle" Bishop's Palace
Yea, they call it a castle, but look at those windows. You can so TOTALLY tell this wasn't built for defense. It was one of the outside walls of the Bishop's palace. (The palace has eroded into the sea.) There are mines and counter mines underneath from the 16th century when the protestants and catholics were at each other.
Cathedral
Cathedral
St. Andrew's has an enormous ruin of a cathedral and its grounds. Another casualty of the religious upheavals in the 16th c. People continued to bury their dead in the grounds though into the 19th c.
North Sea and Seaweed
North Sea and Seaweed
Sunset in mist
Sunset in mist
Watching Sunset on the North Sea
Watching Sunset on the North Sea
Martyrs Monument
Martyrs Monument
A memorial to the people killed and burned for their faith in the 16th c.
Back to King's Cross
Back to King's Cross
Because all roads in England come back to King's Cross in London.
St. Pancras Hotel
St. Pancras Hotel
So the hotel was closed for 70 years. When I walked past it the last time I was here, it was still derelict. But it's been fabulously redone and has reopened as a Marriott.
Big Posh is Big
Big Posh is Big
British Library
British Library
I managed to ride the train down from St. Andrew's Scotland to London in time to renew my British Library card late that afternoon.
Glass of well-earned wine
Glass of well-earned wine
Enjoyed sitting for a bit and resting after a full Monday of train catching, suitcase dragging, and library reader's ticket renewing.
This close
This close
The ornate building on the right is my hotel. The brick building on the left is the British Library. I can literally throw a stone from my fifth floor room to the balcony of the British Library.
Shelly on Tuesday
Shelly on Tuesday
Shelly arrives!
Pub before the death march
Pub before the death march
Splendid dinner at the pub across the street from the hotel. But alas, the death march of touring followed. We tried to do the London tour bus, but they took us downtown and abandoned us. We made our way back via cab, and two subway stations, and far too many stairs. We swear to be better prepared for adventures tomorrow.